U of T moves up one spot to 22nd globally in latest Shanghai university rankings

U of Toronto News (photo by Daria Perevenzentsev) The University of Toronto has climbed one spot to 22nd in the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities, achieving its highest position globally since the ranking began in 2003. The annual rankings by ShanghaiRanking Consultancy also saw U of T retain its position as Canada’s top university while ranking sixth among public universities in North America and 11th among public universities globally. The 2021 edition of the rankings looked at more than 2,000 universities around the world and assessed them based on research impact, quality of…

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U of T department of astronomy and astrophysics celebrates new name in honour of long-time supporters, the Dunlap family

U of Toronto News It is a historic time for the University of Toronto’s department of astronomy and astrophysics – not only as it approaches its centenary next year, but also as it embraces a new name: the David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics. The new name was announced officially Dec. 19 at a reception to honour the Dunlap family, hosted by U of T President Meric Gertler and Professor Melanie Woodin, dean of the Faculty of Arts & Science. “This very fitting development recognizes the historic benefaction made in…

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U of Toronto launches Iranian Student Memorial Scholarship Fund to honor plane crash victims

U of T News The University of Toronto has launched a new endowed fund, the Iranian Student Memorial Scholarship Fund, to honour the memory of those who died in the tragic crash of Ukraine International Airlines flight PS752 in Tehran, Iran. All 176 passengers and crew, including 57 Canadians, were killed. Eight members of the U of T community, including six students, were among those whose names were on the plane’s passenger manifest. The loss of lives, and a determination to memorialize the U of T community members’ contributions, drove…

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Substances that created hole in ozone may account for half of Arctic warming, U of Toronto researchers find

U of Toronto News The substances responsible for creating a massive hole in the Earth’s ozone layer may account for nearly half of Arctic warming over a 50-year period, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto. The research, published in Nature Climate Change, highlights how ozone-depleting substances (ODS) are a significant and unrecognized source of 20th-century Arctic climate change. “Ozone depleting substances in many respects have been an under-appreciated contributor to climate change,” says Karen Smith, an assistant professor, teaching stream, in the department of physical and…

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