IonQ Joins University of Maryland Quantum Startup Foundry, Receives National Innovation Award

University of Maryland, College Park News Release CONTACTS: Sara Gavin , 301-405-0603 sgavin@umd.edu COLLEGE PARK, Md.—IonQ, Inc. (IonQ) (NYSE: IONQ), the leading developer of quantum computing devices born out of research at the University of Maryland (UMD) and Duke University, becomes the newest member of the Quantum Startup Foundry at UMD. This collaboration builds upon a strong partnership and a shared commitment between IonQ and UMD to accelerate cutting-edge quantum technologies and develop a thriving quantum ecosystem in the region. The announcement coincides with the news that IonQ has received the 2021 Innovation Award from the Association…

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U of Pittsburgh Alum Fodun Ologunde — From summa cum laude to Apple Inc. software engineer

University of Pittsburg News Though her journey began in Nigeria, it has taken her across the United States and eventually landed her at the University’s Pittsburgh campus to study computer engineering in the Swanson School of Engineering. While here, she discovered her purpose, followed her passion and cemented her place as a scholar and leader. Ologunde’s next stop is Austin, Texas, where she’s begun work as a software engineer for Apple Inc. “ I’m incredibly excited to embark on this journey and can’t wait to explore more of my strengths in…

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Historic Coronation of Mr. & Miss DSU 2021

Delaware State University Campus News In a historic Coronation Ceremony, Delaware State University crowned Jason Smith and Jewel Phillips as its 2021-2022 Mr. and Miss DSU. The Oct 16 ceremony was a historic Del State Coronation as Ms. Phillips became the first-ever Campus Queen to be the daughter of a former Miss DSU. Her mother Kimberly D. Deal, Esq., was the 1986-1987 Miss Delaware State College – a distinction that also made the 2021 Coronation the first time a mother placed the Del State queen’s crown on her daughter’s head. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/albums/72157720031259044/show The…

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Universities yet to grasp ‘enormity’ of slavery redress, says v-c

Admitting profits is a strong start, experts say, but academia has much more central culpability yet to remedy Culled from Times Higher Education/Paul Basken Western universities deserve credit for admitting their historical profits from slavery, according to expert assessments, but have much more work to do on the academic and reparations sides of the ledger. Major blind spots for higher education, after years of emotional public admissions about past ties to slave labour and profits, include the extensive but little-explored history of medical school experimentation on captives, experts told Times Higher Education’s World…

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Renowned saxphonist Eric Darius performs with Del State musicians

Delaware State University On Campus/News As another manifestation of the opportunities students have at Delaware State University, a group of its music majors recently performed on campus with internationally known saxophonist Eric Darius. Mr. Darius, who is also a renowned songwriter and producer, took the first-floor stage in the MLK Jr. Student Center, along with seven Del State music majors, making for an Oct. 15 musically charged lunch hour in the campus’ student union. To hear and view video of the performances, click on the below link After sharing with the MLK audience…

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How Nobel winner UC Berkeley David Card transformed economics

By Anne Brice, UC Berkeley News| On Monday, Oct. 11, labor economist and UC Berkeley professor of economics David Card won the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics. In this interview, Card talks with Berkeley News writer Edward Lempinen about why his research on the economics of the minimum wage, immigration and education was so controversial — and how it continues to be today.  David Card, a labor economist and UC Berkeley professor of economics, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics. (UC Berkeley photo by Keegan Houser). Read a transcript of Berkeley Voices episode #87:…

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Georgia state universities weaken tenure protections

Move bolsters fears of political attacks on US higher education and prompts AAUP to consider boycott From Times Higher Education/Paul Source: iStock The governing board of higher education in the US state of Georgia, surrounded by faculty protesters, voted to expand its systems for removing tenured professors over alleged job performance concerns. The Georgia Board of Regents said it took the action – covering 7,500 tenured professors at 25 public campuses in Georgia – to help its faculty improve and to let institutions shed those who do not. Opponents, however, listed concerns that included the regents citing the relatively…

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NASA wants to harvest water on moon and Mars, and Virginia Tech team thinks it can help

From Daily Press Deep beneath Mars’ red clay surface lie ancient oceans now frozen into ice sheets. Earth’s moon has hidden water deposits, too — pockets embedded deep inside its rocks. It’s the kind of liquid treasure scientists at NASA hope to one day mine using specialized drilling tools on the moon or Mars. As NASA looks for new technology to use in space, the agency is mining a different treasure to help develop those tools: the ingenuity of student engineers. To that end, 10 student teams from universities around…

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Texas universities brace for backlash against anti-abortion law

Legislative ban leaves medical schools vowing to protect women’s health, and faculty and students likely to flee Culled from Times Higher Education Source: Getty Texas’ anti-abortion law looks likely to cost the state’s universities in enrolment and beyond, especially in medical schools where leaders are struggling to assess where and how they must revise curricula. The law, which took effect this month, prohibits abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy, with no exceptions for rape or incest. It’s almost certain to affect medical training practices in Texas and the willingness…

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Harvard professors discuss how a hormone affects society

 From Harvard Gazette Carole Hooven and Dan Gilbert discuss testosterone’s impact on individuals, as well as on wider society. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Testosterone plays major role in male aggressiveness, violence, evolutionary biologist says BY Alvin PowellHarvard Staff Writer Hooven, lecturer and co-director of undergraduate studies in Human Evolutionary Biology, waded directly into the nature versus nurture debate Thursday evening, laying out her case for the hormone’s function as a foundation for aspects of male behavior. She traced the role of testosterone in the natural world, pointing out its role in…

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